Hi, friendly Millennial here to let you know that 'Netflix and chill' doesn't mean what you probably think it does. 

So here's the quick Netflix recap of this week's episode of COVID-19 in Northern Colorado: Most counties are now under 'Level Red' restrictions, and Weld County was like, 'OK, but we're not going to enforce it,' and then over in Longmont the mayor was like, 'Alright, but you can't use our hospitals.'

I know, right? Things are really heating up this week.

Then, Weld County released a statement to Longmont that basically said that the mayor is punishing Weld's working class by illegally denying them healthcare, while others stay home and 'Netflix and chill.'

OK. So. I'm not going to get into that any further. You can take whichever stance you want. I am not a health expert, business owner, politician nor a Weld County resident. I am, however, kind of unfortunately a Netflix and chill expert because guys my age do not know how to just take a girl to dinner. Like, who raised these boys?

So, what I am going to do is explain that 'Neflix and chill' does not mean 'hang out at home and watch Netflix to ride out this pandemic.' In fact, I think less of us have been 'Netflix and chilling' this year, thanks to social distancing.

It means inviting someone over to — you know, I will just let Urban Dictionary take it from here (and it is NSFW but you're probably at home anyway).

Or, maybe the joke's on us, and they do mean stay home, and, ya know *wink*. Just remember, friends, from one Tinder user to another, make sure to do your COVI-dating safely. 

I hope that Weld County and Longmont can repair their relationship before the season finale.

Enter your number to get our free mobile app

20 Words and Phrases That Are So 2020