Have you ever spent the night in an abandoned TITAN nuclear missile silo? Why not? Take a tour of this one located in a remote field in Dear Trail, Colorado.

These are some classy accommodations, coming in at a cost of $44.5 million.

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WARNING: Under no circumstances should you enter this property. By doing so you risk bodily harm and/or prosecution for trespassing on private property.

You've Probably Driven By This 1,000 Times and Didn't Know It

The site featured here, 2B, is right off of Interstate 70, about midway between Denver and a lovely oasis located in the middle of nowhere called Limon. You've probably driven this stretch of interstate countless times.

Abandoned Missile Silo Deer Trail Colorado
Google Maps / Canva
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Six Such Facilities in Colorado

This particular location is one of six former Titan I missile complexes in Colorado. According to Colorado.gov, four structures, designated as 1A, 1B, 1C, and 2A, are located on the Former Lowry Bombing and Gunnery Range east of Aurora, Colorado. Another, designated 2C, can be found south of Elizabeth, Colorado. Lastly, you have the site shown above, located north of Deer Trail.

Specs On a Titan I Missile

According to Colorado.gov, "The Titan I was one of the first strategic, intercontinental ballistic missiles developed by the United States. The 98-foot-long, two-stage missile was fueled by kerosene (RP-1 fuel) and liquid oxygen, and was designed to carry nuclear warheads."

Things to Know Before You Begin Your Virtual Tour

  • The video above was recorded during three different visits to the site. According to Lofi Urbex, the party responsible for the video, "The owners are known to call the police, so be careful."
  • One part of this structure was still operational roughly 20 years ago. An elevator remained in service and was used to remove salvageable equipment.
  • The place is "incredibly dangerous." You're likely to encounter "huge sudden drops."
  • You're likely to run into other explorers.

When Did These Say 'Bye Bye'?

The sites were decommissioned and the missiles were removed clear back in 1965. The facilities now belong to public and private owners.

Are People Really Supposed to be Hanging Out In There?

It should come as no surprise these sites did bring up a few concerns regarding environmental issues. During the fall of 2009, Site Inspection fieldwork was completed at Complex 2B. The only issue noted involved polychlorinated biphenyls, a.k.a. PCBs, in the lagoon wastes. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers removed the impacted soils.

Directly below is the Youtube video from Lofi Urbex. I never thought I would have to say this, but with all the graffiti, this tour is not entirely SFW.

Tour An Abandoned Titan I Missile Silo Near Dear Trail Colorado

Take a quick tour of this abandoned missile silo in Colorado. Personally, I recommend this photo tour over visiting the actual site. You'll notice several highly dangerous drops. In addition, you never know who you might run in to.

Remembering Now Abandoned Colorado Amusement Park

WARNING: Under no circumstances should you enter this property. By doing so you risk bodily harm and/or prosecution for trespassing on private property.

Heritage Square was an amusement park in Golden, Colorado that was open from 1959 to 2018.

Check Out an Abandoned Hospital + Power Plant in Colorado

WARNING: Under no circumstances should you enter this property. By doing so you risk bodily harm and/or prosecution for trespassing on private property.

These buildings that once served as both a hospital and power plant have all been totally abandoned.