Imagine 'Footloose,' but with more rollerblading. This cheesy 90s movie even has a race down the 'Devil's Backbone,' but even though the landmark sounds the same as Loveland's, it is definitely not.

In 'Footloose,' Ren is transported from Chicago to Utah to live with his aunt and uncle,  where he wins over his town with his dancing. In the 1993 'Airborne,' our hero, Mitchell, gets moved from California to Cincinnati to live with his aunt and uncle, where he wins over the town with... his rollerblading skills.

The movie features a 'Devil's Backbone,' which is how it caught my attention, having grown up in Loveland with our own 'Devil's Backbone.'

Is there a girl involved?

Yes, just like in 'Footloose,' our hero is trying to win over a girl, named Nikki.

Is rollerblading illegal in this?

No. And also, unlike 'Footloose,'  there's no angry pastor-father trying to keep his daughter from participating in rollerblading.

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Is anybody we might know in 'Airborne?'

Jack Black and Seth Green are in it, but no other big names from today.

Where does the 'Devil's Backbone' come in?

The landmark enters for the film's climax, which is about the regular guys (Mitchell's group) versus The Preps. After a classic, confrontational back-and-forth escalation between the two roller-hockey teams, they agree to a challenge to finish the movie. Both teams race down the 'Devil's Backbone,' a notoriously dangerous street route, in Cincinnati. The first team with three players to finish wins.

Win what?

Bragging rights, mostly.

It's a climactic scene with all these young guys racing down a steep street, dodging traffic, falling out of the race, and our hero, Mitchell, actually leaping over an oncoming car. No wonder he gets the girl in the end.

Is there really a 'Devil's Backbone' in Cincinnati?

Yes. There's Devil's Backbone Road, a 'roller coaster' of a road.

Take a look at 'Airborne:'

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