For the second time in four days, I've found a scorpion in my home. Let me repeat that... scorpion... in my home. What kind of scorpions do we have in Colorado, and is there any need to be worried?

Should you encounter a scorpion within the state of Colorado, it is more than likely one of three varieties. Would any of the three be considered dangerous?

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Scorpions In Western Colorado

This little guy was hanging out in my bedroom in Grand Junction, Colorado. This was the first to be found, making itself at home in mid-August. As you look at the photo, allow me to assure you of two things:

  • the scorpion was quite dead when I found it
  • Despite how it looks, I do occasionally clean my floors.
Scorpion Found In Waylon's House
Waylon Jordan
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Oddly, nothing comes to mind such as activities in my home or landscaping projects in the yard that might have stirred them up. It's unclear why they are currently checking in at Chateau Jordan.

Three Varieties of Scropion You're Likely To Encounter In Colorado

According to Mug-a-Bug, Colorado is home to three species of scorpion:

  • the common striped bark scorpion
  • northern desert hairy scorpion
  • northern scorpion

AZ Animals describes the animals as "Menacing, adaptable, and venomous..." They add scorpions belonging to the Arachnida class and order Scorpiones. The Arachnida class also includes spiders, ticks, and mites.

There are roughly 1,500 identified species around the world, with approximately 40 species in the United States.

Where You'll Find Them

According to AZ Animals, scorpions prefer arid regions. They have been known, however, to set up shop in woods, grassy meadows, and caves. You frequently find them under wood piles (I'll vouch for that), under rocks (there, too), or underground covers. Some seem to prefer my bedroom and living room.

Are The Species Found In Colorado Dangerous?

Not really, at least not to humans. When you picture a scorpion, one of the first things that comes to mind is the stinger on the end of its "tail." In reality, that isn't a tail, but rather an extension of the scorpion's abdomen.

In the unfortunate event you get "stung," in most cases, there's no cause for alarm. Mug-A-Bug writes, "The scorpion’s stinger is primarily utilized as a defense mechanism. Resembling the pain associated with a stinging insect or wasp sting, none of the Colorado species of scorpion have venom associated with dangerous complications."

While not necessarily dangerous, a sting from a Colorado scorpion is no walk on the beach. My late grandmother, who lived on Little Park Road in Grand Junction, received a scorpion sting right on the butt. While it didn't make her ill, it really pissed her off.

How To Recognize The Three Species In Colorado

You'll sleep easier at night knowing none of these three look anything like the scorpions from Clash of the Titans. You won't have to engage in hand-to-hand combat with them. For your convenience, here's a look at the three common species of scorpion you'll encounter in Colorado.

Three Varieties of Scorpion You're Likely To Encounter In Colorado

For the second time in four days, I've found a scorpion in my home. What kind of scorpions are these, and is there any need to be worried?

Should you encounter a scorpion within the state of Colorado, it is more than likely one of three varieties. Would any of the three be considered dangerous?


Slither Through Some of the Snakes You'll Find in Colorado

There are a reported 28 different species of snakes in Colorado. They range from non-venomous to venomous, which are only three different types of rattlesnakes.

Take a look at the most common snakes in Colorado:

Grand Junction, Colorado Spotted These Animals Out in the Yard

Have you ever looked out the window of your home only to spot wildlife making a shortcut out of your backyard? What critters have you seen out in the yard in Grand Junction? Scroll on to see what others have spotted in and around Grand Junction, Colorado.

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